“visual arrangement as inquiry”

Delagrange refigures the rhetorical canon of arrangement as “an invention strategy in twenty-first century interactive digital media” (107). To refigure arrangment, she draws from the concept of Wunderkammer, a collection of objects that “uses the arrangement and re-arrangement of objects to create new knowledge” (107). Through the concept of Wunderkammer, Delagrange images arrangement as “a material, embodied techne which, through hypermediated linking of visual and verbal evidence, enables a process of wonder and discover that promotes thoughtful inquiry and insight (106).

Her more robust concept of arranement, Delagrange notes, operates outside of “genre-defined rules” used to limit possibilities for invention through organization and arrangement (109). Likewise, preferences toward clarity (such as those discussed by Ede, Glenn, and Lunsford), have further limited organization and arrangement to generic forms.

A concept of techne is a centerpiece of her theory. She defines techne as “artistic knowledge, formed in a relational oscillation between thinking and doing that becomes more intutive with expertise” (111). It is heuristic, attentive to processes of making and thinking, and “remaking, through which meaning and knowledge are made” (111). Further, it is mobile, strategic, contextual, adaptable, and ethical. Because of these characteristics, a techne of arrangment can respond to rhetorical situations.

And because it is ethical, founded in specific beliefs and values, Delagrange identifies her canon of visual arrangement as a feminist practice. Citing the capacity for digital technologies to decenter authority, to socially construct knowledge, and to embrace multiplicity as well as Haraway’s concept of “situated knowledges”, Delagrange argues that her digital, visual canon of arrangement “provides one model for constructive hypermedia and feminist practice in writing classrooms” (117).

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